Reviews

Creating Study Guides

Study Guides Teach a Man to Fish
Kyle Schwab, College Sophomore
Canada College, Redwood City, CA

I believe that study guides are the most effective method to studying for exams or preparing for essays in most humanities classes. The finished product contains less significance than creating the product itself. Every step in the method of creating study guides should be seen as an approach to learning.

At the beginnings of creating study guides, concept mapping is a very important aspect. This requires students to place concepts in an organized fashion, so that similarities as well as contrasts can be drawn from interactions between various concepts. Writing the study guide after concept mapping can be quite helpful. Writing a linear study guide has always seemed to produce the best results for me. A point A to point B approach seems to always organize information best for recollection during exams.

Two Birds with One Mind
Crafton Hills, Redalnds, CA

Visual Organization and creating a study guide that links to your everyday life is a great way to prepare for an upcoming test or assignment. Visually educating yourself with maps and diagrams not only helps you picture what your studying for, but connecting those images with something or somethings you see often will spark an automatic review in your mind, even when you don't even notice. Your mind will connect the image of your diagram or study guide with a similar visual in the real world.

Often, even just drawing and creating your actual study guide is much like studying twice in just one sitting. First of all, you are creating this study guide for yourself, so, having to refer back to your assignment to create questions or facts for the study guide itself is forcing you to study the content already. Then, after your study is done going back to answer your own questions is doubling your learning in the one sitting. An example would be a student writing on his arm to attempt to cheat on an upcoming test. But what the student does not know, is by writing on his arm to try and cheat, he is studying. In the end, the student who tried to cheat, does not even need to look at his arm for the answers, because he had to read the content and write it. With this he has learned everything he did not remember for the test.

What's a Study Guide?
Patrick Almazan, College Freshman
Intercoast, West Covina, CA

What's the purpose behind study guides? Why use one? Study Guides are used to organize lecture notes and textual information in a way that compounds large amounts of information for better retention. The three main steps to making a study guide are condense, visualize, and create. Examples of study guides are as follows: Concept maps, comparison chart, and concept cards.

Study Guides
jessica boone
Chemeketa Community College, Yamhill, OR

This article explains a lot on how to become successful in studying and keeping the information fresh in your memory. I have been testing myself with some of these ideas and found out that it's pretty true reviewing often is keeping information fresh in my mind and I'm able to recall the information quickly. Writing out your progress is very rewarding it helps you see what you have accomplished and how well you are doing.

Study tools
College Freshman
Chemeketa Community College, Salem, OR

I really liked this site. It was a lot easier to read than most of the others. This particular article covered the same topics as our text book in almost the same order. There are many tools available to help students study. This really helped me figure out what is best for me.

Study guides
Amparo Marshall
Chemeketa Community College, Salem Oregon

I like using study guides to help me review my information. They condense what you need to study, so it cuts down on how much time you spend studying as you are able to focus mainly on what you have to learn, not on filler. This article gave good points that I found really helpful.

Study Guides
Patrice, College Freshman
Ultimate Medical Academy, Tampa, Florida

I'm able to visualize the information that I have provided to help me study better for a test or quiz by creating a study guide. Creating note cards, charts, even maps really helps me to learn more, rather than keep going back through the text book. A study guide works even better.

Review- Creating Study Guides
Maribel Barocio
Chemeketa Community College, Salem, OR

This article stood out from all the others, because it gives you different options on visual note taking. Not everybody learns the same way, so it was great that it included other options. Also, there are different methods that work for different subjects, which works with this article because it explains each method.

Study Guides for Success
Brittany Rhoades, College Freshman
Ultimate Medical Academy, Florida

Study guides help me by keeping me organized, and giving me the information in front of my face helps. I am more of a visual learner.When I see the information and read it to myself it is more helpful.

Creating Effective Study Guides
Amy Lake, College Junior
Chemeketa Community college, McMinnville, OR

I really enjoyed this article. I am learning all kinds of new ways to take notes and to help create my study notes. I have always just read through my notes before exams and reviewed materials that were relevant, but these ideas will help me study more effectively and with an increased success rate. I think I may try use all of them in different ways because each is unique in the type of class it can be effective with. Good article-I recommend it.

creating study guides
shelly seiber, College Freshman
Chemeketa Community College, salem

I really liked this site, it is very helpful. The one I like to use is the concept cards, or as they put it "flash cards on steroids", lol, very funny but true.They include a lot more andare very helpful.

Creating Study Guides
Douglas Shearer, College Sophomore
Chemeketa Community College, Salem, OR

I found this article useful in that it introduced me to comparison charts that when used alongside "mind maps" gives a different approach to a subject. Comparison charts are a chance to illustrate the differences in information of fact and theory and thus enabling myself to have a better understanding of subject I am learning .

Write it out!
College Freshman
Chemeketa Community College, Salem,OR

This article explains a lot on how to become successful in studying and keeping the information fresh in your memory. I have been testing myself with some of these ideas and found out that it's pretty true reviewing often is keeping information fresh in my mind and I'm able to recall the information quickly. Writing out your progress is very rewarding. It helps you see what you have accomplished and how well you are doing.


« BACK

How to Study Model

How to Study Model

Write a Review

Write a Review

Be the first from your college to be published here. All you have to do is to write a comment about how a study skills handout was helpful. Or you could add some handy tips of your own. Click on write review.

Find a Tutor

Looking for a free or paid private tutor?

Just for Fun

Just for Fun

"Im hiding." Look for this image on the study skills pages for more cartoons!